Tag Archive for save the world

Part Two: Newborn and Toddlers

Your baby comes into the world; you’re happy yet insecure: am I doing everything right? Has my baby everything it needs? You need a few days to realize that there is a new family member living in your house now.

It takes time to get familiar with all the different needs of the baby, what it likes and dislikes or what it wants when it screams in a particular way. You don’t have to worry about doing something wrong. It’s in a mother’s nature to try and do everything for her baby.

“Making the decision to have a child is momentous – it is to decide forever to have your heart walking around outside your body.” (E. Stone)

So everything you do, you do not only for yourself but also for your child. You do it with love, passion and dedication, and the baby feels that. It will feel the comfort, the love and the attention. The newborn will receive only the best: the best products, the best food, and the best care, just because you want to make sure it’s fine. As far as child care is concerned, everything, starting from their health, hygiene and safety at home and outside the home needs to be considered.

Basically, if you fully dedicate yourself to the new challenge and trust your motherly instincts, you can’t do anything wrong. You will see your beautiful and healthy baby grow a little more each and every day.

You might like this offers on http://barterquest.com

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The Secret to Saving Money

originally from daveramsey.com

The Secret to Saving Money

In the house of the wise are stores of choice food and oil, but a foolish man devours all he has. –Proverbs 21:20

Saving money is not a matter of math. You will not save money when you get that next raise. You will not save money when that car is paid off. You will not save money when the kids are grown. You will only save money when it becomes an emotional priority.

We all know we need to save, but most people don’t save like they know they need to save. Why? Because they have competing goals. The goal to save isn’t a high enough priority to delay that purchase of the pizza, DVD player, new computer, or china cabinet. So we purchase, buy, consume all our dollars away or, worse yet, go into debt to buy these things. That debt means monthly payments that control our paychecks and make us say things like, “We just don’t make enough to save any money!” Wrong, wrong, wrong! We do make enough to save money; we just aren’t willing to quit spoiling ourselves with our little projects or pleasures to have enough left to save. I don’t care what you make—you can save money. It just has to become a big enough priority to you.

If a doctor told you that your child was dying and could only be saved with a $15,000 operation that your insurance would not cover and could only be performed nine months from today, could you save $15,000? Yes! Of course you could! You would sell things, you would stop any spending that wasn’t required to survive, and you would take two extra jobs. For that short nine months, you would become a saving madman (or madwoman). You would give up virtually anything to accomplish that $15,000 goal. Saving would become a priority.

The secret to saving? Focused emotion. The secret to saving money is to make it a priority, and that is done only when you get some healthy anger or fear and then focus that emotion on your personal decisions. Harnessing that emotion will make you move yourself to the top of your creditor list. Then ask yourself, “Which bill is the most important? After tithing, who should I pay first this month?” The answer is you! Until you pay God first, then yourself, then everyone and everything else, you will never save money.

The advertisers and marketing community are affecting our emotions every day and taking every dollar we have by making us see our wants as needs. It is time for this to stop! Emotions make great slaves, but they are lousy masters. No matter how educated or sophisticated we are, if we are not saving all we should be, we are being ruled by emotions, not harnessing them as financial planning slaves.

So whether you are saving for college tuition, a trip to the family reunion, new school clothes for little Bobby or Sally, or anything else, start saving now! It’s never too late!

How to Survive in the Small Business Life

By Jim Blasingame, Posted November 2, 2009

http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2009/nov/02/small-business-advocate-barter-can-be-useful/

In his landmark 1776 book “Wealth of Nations,” Adam Smith called money one of the three great inventions, including the written word and mathematics. Money has helped businesses grow more efficiently, markets expand more dynamically and nations trade more effectively.

But there is something still in use in the marketplace today that humans used for millennia before money: barter. Indeed, barter birthed the marketplace.

In simple terms, barter is the direct and mutual exchange of goods and/or services between two parties. The Latin term, quid pro quo, “something for something,” is the original definition of barter. Think of the frontier doctor who took a chicken and a sack of potatoes for delivering a baby.

Over the past hundred years or so, a combination of the ubiquity of money and the growth of financial tools and resources has relegated barter to the marketplace minor leagues. Nevertheless, barter is still being conducted, primarily between businesses that know each other and have a mutual need for what the other offers. For example, a printer barters a brochure job for food from a local restaurant. Or a lawyer accepts personal and/or real assets from a client in barter for legal representation.

Small business should look for barter opportunities. For example, with too much inventory and too little cash, barter can be part of a survival strategy in a bad economy. Slow-turning goods become the equivalent of cash to pay for something that in a better economy would have been covered by the cash flow and profits from customer sales. Plus, there are tax advantages with barter, but also tax reporting requirements. So consult a tax professional before bartering.

As handy as barter can be, it does have three inherent challenges that money was invented to address: 1) Party familiarity, 2) Timing, and 3) Relative value. But a few entrepreneurs have created something to overcome these limitations in much the same way that money does, while keeping the advantages of barter. They’re called barter networks or exchanges.

A barter network becomes the nexus between parties by offering services that address the challenges mentioned above, including 1) barter credits that can be used any time in exchange for 2) a variety of goods and services from a catalog the network has aggregated from and for its members.

Before using a barter network, remember you may be exchanging assets today for future redemption. So conduct the due diligence to make sure the barter network has experience and a good track record.

Green Surviving

Posted by Herbalpagan at Sunday, November 15, 2009

http://greensurviving.blogspot.com/2009/11/interesting-ideas.html

I read an interesting story today. It seems that a town (a larger one too) is having money problems and one of the budget cuts was mowing a meadow. A lady who owns dairy goats is being allowed to let her goats keep the meadow mowed. Good fodder for the goats and free mowing for the town. I’m thinking that many towns might be open to such an idea these days. I wonder what other ideas like that will come out of these economic hard times. It makes sense though and government rarely makes sense, so it must be the smaller governments that do these things.

One year, the small town I raised my kids in had a budget shortfall and the school budget was targeted. It was decided that gym, art,and all extras would be cut. There were many teachers in the school who lived in the town too, and they fought their own union to be able to contribute to the solution. They gave up cost of living raises for two years. The parent group paid for a weekly sports program, volunteers came in daily and ran the computer program and volunteers ran two talent shows with afternoon practices to help with the art and gym issue. It worked and worked well. Solutions can start at the ground level, instead of letting big government come up with them.

This led me to think about how we can make common sense solutions a part of our lives. I think that barter must be a part of those solutions. I can barter a ton of holiday crafts or jam and pickles for some maple syrup and a couple of hours of wood cutting. We need to think of these things and actually implement them into our lives more. We are so used to either doing without or paying hard cash for the things we want and need when barter and haggling is accepted in many parts of the world. I wonder when good sense went out of fashion in this country? Perhaps this is a case of “the proof is in the pudding” as the saying goes…this economy is in trouble and most Americans spend like nothing is different.

Just some thoughts.

In Bad Times, Bartering Can Beat Buying

Why barter? Here are some reasons, and some cautions.

Originally posted by Laura Cohn

barter

– It’s the new national pastime. Okay, baseball still wins. But given the economic downturn, many people are reverting to this ancient form of commerce. Craigslist recently reported that bartering activity on the site had jumped more than 80 percent in the past year. Sites such as BarterQuest.com report a surge in interest, too. BarterQuest, which offers swaps on a wide variety of goods and services, drew more than 100,000 visitors just two months after the Web site launched late last year. The reason? Bartering is addictive — and fun. Kent Berryman, founder of  Swap-It-Now.com, says that once users post one item, they usually offer up more.

– You can trade just about anything. Want to upgrade your camera? Online retailer Adorama will give you a free quote on a price for your old camera and cut you a check or offer a credit toward new equipment. Dying to break your car lease? Go to Swapalease.com or LeaseTrader.com, which, for a fee, will pair people who want to unload their leases with people who want to assume them. But don’t stop there. At SwapThing.com, recent trades included a gas clothes dryer for a high-speed table saw, a personal-shopping jaunt for a Nintendo Game Boy and games, and a service swap between a hairdresser and an accountant.

– Let the barterer beware. Craigslist doesn’t prescreen users. So if you’re looking to swap for a service you really need — such as babysitting — start by contacting friends and neighbors. Or try a site that verifies the addresses and phone numbers of its users, such as BarterBee.com. BarterBee lets you trade CDs, movies and video games free of charge. But, says chief executive Robert Alvin, be sure that you know what your product or service is worth. “If you list it too high, it won’t move,” he says.

The Year of Living Without Money

This week we fund a very interesting article about a men who decided to live his life without money.

Originally posted by Mark Boyle

The Guardian, Monday 9 November 2009

Is it possible to live without spending any cash whatsoever? After becoming disillusioned with consumer society, one man decided to give it a try.
The morning I finally decided to give up using cash, the whole world changed. It was the same day news broke about the banks’ misbehaviour in the sub-prime mortgage market, so when I began telling people of my plans, they assumed it was in preparation for some sort of apocalyptic financial meltdown. However, having long viewed credit as a debit against future generations, I was infinitely more worried about what George Monbiot called the “nature crunch”. Nature, unfortunately, doesn’t do bailouts.

I suppose the seeds of my decision to give up money – not just cash but any form of monetary credit – were sown seven years ago, in my final semester of a business and economics degree in Ireland, when I stumbled upon a DVD about Gandhi. He said we should “be the change we want to see in the world”. Trouble was, I hadn’t the faintest idea what change I wanted to be back then. I spent the next five years managing organic food companies, but by 2007, I realised that even “ethical business” would never be quite enough. The organic food industry, while a massive stepping stone to more ecological living, was rife with some of the same environmental flaws as the conventional system it was trying to usurp – excess plastic packaging, massive food miles, big businesses buying up little ones.

My eureka moment came during an afternoon’s philosophising with a mate. We were chatting about global issues such as sweatshops, environmental destruction, factory farms, animal testing labs, wars over resources, when I realised I was looking at the world the wrong way – like a western doctor looks at a patient, focusing on symptoms more than root causes. Instead, I decided to attempt what I awkwardly term “social homeopathy”.
I believe the key reason for so many problems in the world today is the fact we no longer have to see directly the repercussions of our actions. The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that people are completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering involved in the production of the food and other “stuff” we buy. The tool that has enabled this disconnection is money.

If we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today. If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior decor. If we had to clean our own drinking water, we wouldn’t waste it so freely.
As long as money exists, these symptoms will surely persist. So I decided, last November, to give it up, for one year initially, and reconnect directly with the things I use and consume.

The first step in the process was to find a form of sustainable shelter. For this I turned to the amazing project Freecycle, through which I located a caravan that someone else didn’t want any more. I also needed somewhere to put this new home, so I decided to volunteer three days a week at an organic farm near Bristol in return for a place to park my caravan. Had I equated this in terms of my previous salary, it would be like paying penthouse apartment rent for what was effectively a little tin box. But that was the type of thinking I was now trying to get away from.

Having no means of paying bills, the next challenge was to set this home up to be off-grid. For heating I installed a wood-burner I’d converted from an old gas bottle, using a flue pipe I had salvaged from the skip. I fuelled it using wood from trees we coppiced on the farm, meaning fuel miles became fuel metres.
Food was my only other real necessity: I think of there being four legs to the food-for-free “table”. Growing your own, which is obviously what I’ve been doing here on the organic farm (my staples are potatoes, beans, kale, carrots, salads, root vegetables, squash, onions and swede); wild food foraging, which is nutritionally exceptional and beautifully gentle on the environment (I forage for berries, nettles, mushrooms, nuts and greater plantain for a hayfever remedy); and also securing waste food and other goods from local restaurants and shops. This is an incredible resource to draw on, and although its existence is, of course, dependent on industrialised society, I feel like I have an obligation to consume it before using up any more energy producing food.

The final leg of my food table is bartering – using my skills or any excess food I’ve produced to secure anything not met by the other three methods. This means I meet people from all walks of life doing what I do, and while many claim that they couldn’t – or wouldn’t want to – do the same, most seem to understand where I am coming from and resolve to reduce their own consumption wherever they can. When I first said I was going to do this, my parents probably wondered what they should have done differently during my formative years, but now they are right behind it, and may even contemplate joining me one day.

But what I soon realised is that, in a moneyless world, everything takes much more time. Handwashing my clothes in a sink of cold water, using laundry liquid made by boiling up some nuts on my rocket stove, can take two hours, instead of 10 minutes using a washing machine. Finding stuff in skips – such as the steamer I cook with – takes far longer than popping out to the shops for one, and sorting out the compost toilet is a lot more hassle than flushing it “away”.

Cycling the 36-mile round-trip to Bristol also takes a lot more time and energy than driving or catching the bus or train, but it’s also an economical alternative to my old gym subscription, and I find cycling much more enjoyable than using motorised vehicles.

The point is, I’d much rather have my time consumed making my own bread outdoors than kill it watching some reality TV show in a so-called “living” room. Where money once provided me with my primary sense of security, I now find it in friends and the local community. Some of my closest mates are people I only met because I had to build real relationships with others based on trust and kindness, not money.

Rivers & the Sea

It’s almost summer! Everybody is enjoying the sunny weather and thinking about going to the beach… but where to go? Where can you be trustful enough to let your children and dogs play in the water? Are there still non polluted rivers and beaches in your area? Can you go swimming where 2 years ago was a prohibition?

Scary Facts:

- Earth consist of 2/3 water. but all the fresh water streams only represent one hundredth of one percent.
- 14 billion pounds of trash is dumped into the ocean every year
- Plastic bags and other plastic garbage thrown into the ocean kill about 1,000,000 sea creatures every year!

- Approximately 5 million tons of oil produced in the world each ear ends up in the ocean.
- Most American families throw away about 88 pounds of plastic every year.
- Every year enough trash is carried down the LA River to fill the Rosebowl.

Join green living! Help the world to save the water of the earth. Create a future for your kids and give them the opportunity to enjoy the ocean. Already small steps can bring changes. Recycle! Use reusable bags! Start using tumblers instead of plastic cups. Be green!

Big Up to all the supporters of Oceans Day!

Pollution: Open Your Eyes!


Everybody, Everyday. Some updating Facts:

Waste of Water:

♦3-7 gallons for toilet

♦25-30 gallons for tub

♦50-70 gallons for a 10 minute shower

♦1 washing machine load uses 25-40 gallons

♦1 dishwasher load uses 9-12 gallons

       

We each use about 12,000 gallons of water every year
1/3 of all water is used to flush the toilet.

Break Down:

♦plastics take 500 years

♦aluminum cans take 500 years

♦organic materials, take 6 months

♦cotton, rags, paper take 6 months

The garbage in a landfill stays for about 30 years.
In 1995 over 200 of the world landfills were full.
Approximately only 10 percent of every landfill can be cleaned up.
Each person throws away approximately four pounds of garbage every day.

What & Why to Recycle

What Why
aluminum cans - it takes 90% less energy to recycle aluminum cans than to make new ones !
- Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for four hours!
glass bottles – The energy we save when we recycle one glass bottle is enough to light a traditional light bulb for four hours
paper – For every 2000 pounds of paper (1 ton) recycled, we save 7,000 gallons of water free from chemicals.
-Recycled paper requires 64% less energy than making paper from virgin wood pulp, and can save many trees
- Every ton of paper that is recycled saves 17 trees

84 percent of all household waste can be recycled.


Green Facts

1.The US has less than 5% of the population, but makes up 25% of the worlds fossil fuel consumption per year…
- trade for something like an electric scooter
2. Approximately 1 billion trees (that’s 1,000,000,000) worth of paper are thrown away every year in the US…

- Recycle your books! Trade, Swap, Exchange & be GREEN

3. Americans throw away 25,000,000,000 Styrofoam coffee cups every year…

- Barter for a nice tumbler and be green.