Tag Archive for recycle

Part One Of Our New Daily Series About Mothers And The Challenge Of Raising a Child

Part One Of Our New Daily Series About Mothers And The Challenge Of Raising a Child

A new life’s challenge: having a baby! Within the next 9 months there are a lot of things to do and many things to consider, especially if it’s your first child. You have to get clothes, toys and furniture for your newborn. But it’s not necessary to spend all of your hard earned money on things that are brand new. The baby will grow so fast that you have to get new things almost every month.

To avoid stress, the soon-to-be mother should get all the important things for the baby step-by-step. A changing unit, the stroller and a car seat could be obtained during the pregnancy. Thereby, the mother should consider bartering as an option to save money, time and stay green.

But not only material things count to make a baby happy. Especially during the pregnancy, the mother should take care of herself. She should avoid everything which could harm the baby. Drinking a lot of water, vitamins and eating a balanced diet will help the baby to stay healthy.

Pregnancy_bookStrollerSwing

Savannah Tractor Powered by Turkey Oil

Posted on November 28th, 2009
Original post by: Savannah Now
http://savannahnow.com/news/2009-11-28/savannah-tractor-powered-turkey-oil

Now that your turkey is a picked-over carcass, here’s a win-win idea for getting rid of the oil that fried that bird: Wilmington Island farmer Bill Lynes wants used vegetable oil to power his tractor. The county wants to keep all that fat out of local sewers, where it congeals and creates expensive clogs. So they’ve teamed up to collect cooking oil at the Wilmington Island Recycling Center.

He currently collects oil from several local restaurants and a South Carolina nursing home, filters and centirfuges that oil to remove water and particulates, then pumps it into his diesel engine tractor. As an off-road vehicle, it’s a hassle-free use of a free fuel. Vehicles driven on public roads are required to pay road tax on their fuel, a process that’s difficult to comply with where free vegetable oil is concerned, Lynes said.

Lynes approached Chatham County officials several months ago with his idea of collecting used vegetable oil from residents. When they agreed to give it a try, he spent about $800 outfitting the Wilmington Island Recycling Center on Concord Road with a small storage tank just for the job.

Chatham County Environmental Program Coordinator David Nash loves the cooking oil collection not only because it’s a great local recycling effort, but also because the grease that could otherwise end up in local sewage systems is expensive to clean out.

“If you’re on septic, it will clog it,” he said. “If you’re on county sewage, it’ll clog up drains, and you’ll have a backup. It’s imperative not to put grease down the drain. It’s a slow killer.” “It’s like how you have a heart attack – plaque builds up slowly. Once it’s in there, you have a heck of a time getting it out.”

Lynes, who traded-in his Porsche race car when he bought his tractor, has been cultivating his three-quarter acre “town farm” for about a year on family land that once was part of a larger vegetable farm and before that a cotton plantation. He still works in Lynes Realty and Development Company, but he’s clearly a devoted gardener, too.

He barters his vegetables with local markets such as Davis Produce. Friends and neighbors get his chickens’ eggs. “I’m sort of in a learning process now,” he said. “I want to know what works, like bartering with people and giving stuff to friends.” And maybe, if it catches on, collecting used cooking oil.

Consider Bartering When Paying Your Tuition

Posted on November, 24th 2009
Original post by: DailySkiff
http://media.www.tcudailyskiff.com/media/storage/paper792/news/2009/11/24/Opinion/Satire.Consider.Bartering.When.Paying.Your.Tuition-3840150.shtml

Since tuition is set to increase to $30,000 for the 2010-2011 school year, students are going to have to be more creative with how they pay for their tuition. While it is beneficial to get a summer job or practice saving money during the year, I think it’s time we reinvigorate a time-honored tradition: bartering.

Frankly, I can’t afford the $30,000 next year, even with my scholarship and a summer job. But I don’t want to disrespect the education I’m receiving by not paying my bills. So when the first bill drops in my account, I plan to visit Chancellor Victor Boschini in his office and bring him my tuition deposit personally. He accepts cows as payment, right?

If not, I’m sure I can get a hold of a chicken or two. Times are tough though. He might have to make do with a pair of slightly-used tennis shoes and my good word that I will get TCU my tuition payment as soon as the next farmers market opens.

In my mind, bartering is a tradition that faded away unnecessarily with the advent of coinage. Even as the great empires of the world expanded, and with them the use of a standardized coin, bartering is a practice that remained. You scratch my back, I’ll scratch yours. You let me copy your notes from class, and I won’t tell your parents exactly how drunk you were at the last tailgate. It’s a fair (mostly) and often interesting exchange.

Another benefit of bartering is determining what others value beyond money. Sure, cold hard cash makes the rest of your unappealing Christmas presents seem a little more bearable, but why settle for cash when you can have a pair of handmade socks from your grandmother, fresh off the knitting needles? How about making someone else a meal in exchange for help studying? Supposing you can cook, this is a pretty sweet deal.

While it’s not quite as fair anymore to trade your daughter for a fresh plot of land, there are many benefits to bartering. It can, in fact, increase the breadth of our education and the university should support it.

In Bad Times, Bartering Can Beat Buying

Why barter? Here are some reasons, and some cautions.

Originally posted by Laura Cohn

barter

– It’s the new national pastime. Okay, baseball still wins. But given the economic downturn, many people are reverting to this ancient form of commerce. Craigslist recently reported that bartering activity on the site had jumped more than 80 percent in the past year. Sites such as BarterQuest.com report a surge in interest, too. BarterQuest, which offers swaps on a wide variety of goods and services, drew more than 100,000 visitors just two months after the Web site launched late last year. The reason? Bartering is addictive — and fun. Kent Berryman, founder of  Swap-It-Now.com, says that once users post one item, they usually offer up more.

– You can trade just about anything. Want to upgrade your camera? Online retailer Adorama will give you a free quote on a price for your old camera and cut you a check or offer a credit toward new equipment. Dying to break your car lease? Go to Swapalease.com or LeaseTrader.com, which, for a fee, will pair people who want to unload their leases with people who want to assume them. But don’t stop there. At SwapThing.com, recent trades included a gas clothes dryer for a high-speed table saw, a personal-shopping jaunt for a Nintendo Game Boy and games, and a service swap between a hairdresser and an accountant.

– Let the barterer beware. Craigslist doesn’t prescreen users. So if you’re looking to swap for a service you really need — such as babysitting — start by contacting friends and neighbors. Or try a site that verifies the addresses and phone numbers of its users, such as BarterBee.com. BarterBee lets you trade CDs, movies and video games free of charge. But, says chief executive Robert Alvin, be sure that you know what your product or service is worth. “If you list it too high, it won’t move,” he says.

The Year of Living Without Money

This week we fund a very interesting article about a men who decided to live his life without money.

Originally posted by Mark Boyle

The Guardian, Monday 9 November 2009

Is it possible to live without spending any cash whatsoever? After becoming disillusioned with consumer society, one man decided to give it a try.
The morning I finally decided to give up using cash, the whole world changed. It was the same day news broke about the banks’ misbehaviour in the sub-prime mortgage market, so when I began telling people of my plans, they assumed it was in preparation for some sort of apocalyptic financial meltdown. However, having long viewed credit as a debit against future generations, I was infinitely more worried about what George Monbiot called the “nature crunch”. Nature, unfortunately, doesn’t do bailouts.

I suppose the seeds of my decision to give up money – not just cash but any form of monetary credit – were sown seven years ago, in my final semester of a business and economics degree in Ireland, when I stumbled upon a DVD about Gandhi. He said we should “be the change we want to see in the world”. Trouble was, I hadn’t the faintest idea what change I wanted to be back then. I spent the next five years managing organic food companies, but by 2007, I realised that even “ethical business” would never be quite enough. The organic food industry, while a massive stepping stone to more ecological living, was rife with some of the same environmental flaws as the conventional system it was trying to usurp – excess plastic packaging, massive food miles, big businesses buying up little ones.

My eureka moment came during an afternoon’s philosophising with a mate. We were chatting about global issues such as sweatshops, environmental destruction, factory farms, animal testing labs, wars over resources, when I realised I was looking at the world the wrong way – like a western doctor looks at a patient, focusing on symptoms more than root causes. Instead, I decided to attempt what I awkwardly term “social homeopathy”.
I believe the key reason for so many problems in the world today is the fact we no longer have to see directly the repercussions of our actions. The degrees of separation between the consumer and the consumed have increased so much that people are completely unaware of the levels of destruction and suffering involved in the production of the food and other “stuff” we buy. The tool that has enabled this disconnection is money.

If we grew our own food, we wouldn’t waste a third of it as we do today. If we made our own tables and chairs, we wouldn’t throw them out the moment we changed the interior decor. If we had to clean our own drinking water, we wouldn’t waste it so freely.
As long as money exists, these symptoms will surely persist. So I decided, last November, to give it up, for one year initially, and reconnect directly with the things I use and consume.

The first step in the process was to find a form of sustainable shelter. For this I turned to the amazing project Freecycle, through which I located a caravan that someone else didn’t want any more. I also needed somewhere to put this new home, so I decided to volunteer three days a week at an organic farm near Bristol in return for a place to park my caravan. Had I equated this in terms of my previous salary, it would be like paying penthouse apartment rent for what was effectively a little tin box. But that was the type of thinking I was now trying to get away from.

Having no means of paying bills, the next challenge was to set this home up to be off-grid. For heating I installed a wood-burner I’d converted from an old gas bottle, using a flue pipe I had salvaged from the skip. I fuelled it using wood from trees we coppiced on the farm, meaning fuel miles became fuel metres.
Food was my only other real necessity: I think of there being four legs to the food-for-free “table”. Growing your own, which is obviously what I’ve been doing here on the organic farm (my staples are potatoes, beans, kale, carrots, salads, root vegetables, squash, onions and swede); wild food foraging, which is nutritionally exceptional and beautifully gentle on the environment (I forage for berries, nettles, mushrooms, nuts and greater plantain for a hayfever remedy); and also securing waste food and other goods from local restaurants and shops. This is an incredible resource to draw on, and although its existence is, of course, dependent on industrialised society, I feel like I have an obligation to consume it before using up any more energy producing food.

The final leg of my food table is bartering – using my skills or any excess food I’ve produced to secure anything not met by the other three methods. This means I meet people from all walks of life doing what I do, and while many claim that they couldn’t – or wouldn’t want to – do the same, most seem to understand where I am coming from and resolve to reduce their own consumption wherever they can. When I first said I was going to do this, my parents probably wondered what they should have done differently during my formative years, but now they are right behind it, and may even contemplate joining me one day.

But what I soon realised is that, in a moneyless world, everything takes much more time. Handwashing my clothes in a sink of cold water, using laundry liquid made by boiling up some nuts on my rocket stove, can take two hours, instead of 10 minutes using a washing machine. Finding stuff in skips – such as the steamer I cook with – takes far longer than popping out to the shops for one, and sorting out the compost toilet is a lot more hassle than flushing it “away”.

Cycling the 36-mile round-trip to Bristol also takes a lot more time and energy than driving or catching the bus or train, but it’s also an economical alternative to my old gym subscription, and I find cycling much more enjoyable than using motorised vehicles.

The point is, I’d much rather have my time consumed making my own bread outdoors than kill it watching some reality TV show in a so-called “living” room. Where money once provided me with my primary sense of security, I now find it in friends and the local community. Some of my closest mates are people I only met because I had to build real relationships with others based on trust and kindness, not money.

Rivers & the Sea

It’s almost summer! Everybody is enjoying the sunny weather and thinking about going to the beach… but where to go? Where can you be trustful enough to let your children and dogs play in the water? Are there still non polluted rivers and beaches in your area? Can you go swimming where 2 years ago was a prohibition?

Scary Facts:

- Earth consist of 2/3 water. but all the fresh water streams only represent one hundredth of one percent.
- 14 billion pounds of trash is dumped into the ocean every year
- Plastic bags and other plastic garbage thrown into the ocean kill about 1,000,000 sea creatures every year!

- Approximately 5 million tons of oil produced in the world each ear ends up in the ocean.
- Most American families throw away about 88 pounds of plastic every year.
- Every year enough trash is carried down the LA River to fill the Rosebowl.

Join green living! Help the world to save the water of the earth. Create a future for your kids and give them the opportunity to enjoy the ocean. Already small steps can bring changes. Recycle! Use reusable bags! Start using tumblers instead of plastic cups. Be green!

Big Up to all the supporters of Oceans Day!

What & Why to Recycle

What Why
aluminum cans - it takes 90% less energy to recycle aluminum cans than to make new ones !
- Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for four hours!
glass bottles – The energy we save when we recycle one glass bottle is enough to light a traditional light bulb for four hours
paper – For every 2000 pounds of paper (1 ton) recycled, we save 7,000 gallons of water free from chemicals.
-Recycled paper requires 64% less energy than making paper from virgin wood pulp, and can save many trees
- Every ton of paper that is recycled saves 17 trees

84 percent of all household waste can be recycled.


Green Facts

1.The US has less than 5% of the population, but makes up 25% of the worlds fossil fuel consumption per year…
- trade for something like an electric scooter
2. Approximately 1 billion trees (that’s 1,000,000,000) worth of paper are thrown away every year in the US…

- Recycle your books! Trade, Swap, Exchange & be GREEN

3. Americans throw away 25,000,000,000 Styrofoam coffee cups every year…

- Barter for a nice tumbler and be green.