Tag Archive for exchange

Bacon Barter

Is it worth to spend millions of dollars into a commercial for a new product? In times of Social Media – where it is rather easy to get attention of a huge community through Facebook, Twitter and YouTube – a well known, traditional American company has the inspiration of barter!

Actually the proposal of “The Great American Bacon Barter” is not new: A man on his mission across the country without any cash and credit cards. In this case actor, comedian and writer Josh Sankey embarked his journey on Monday from New York to Los Angeles and all he has to barter is just a trailer full of 3,000 pounds of that new bacon! After four days on his road trip he bartered the bacon for food, lodging, football tickets and everything else he needed.

But is this project realistic? On the one hand the value of bacon is almost $20,000. So, Josh is able to spend approximately $1,430 a day to travel from the east to the west coast. It’s a large amount for two weeks – just for one person! The other aspect is about the camera team which comes along with him. A camera pays attention and you are focused on the person in front. As a result it makes it easier to get what you want. Nevertheless Josh had to learn how to barter: He didn’t complete his exchanges in the first pace. Step by step he traded his bacon for what he wanted. The actor could be glad that Americans have a fever for bacon!

Apart from that this campaign is a big promotion for the business, brand, product, Josh Sankey and also for barter! Everyone is currently talking about Josh’s expedition and for what he will barter bacon next.
BarterQuest likes his challenge, that he makes bartering more popular and our company will follow him for the next ten days!

Part Three: A New Experience For Your Child: Going To Kindergarten!

The time flew by: it seems like yesterday that your kid learnt hot to walk and now you have to watch him go to kindergarten for the first time. Many things will change again: your child will change. You have to learn to let go and also become familiar with the new situation.

It’s about time again to get new things for your child; like a backpack, lunchbox and their first bike. But all of there things are only odds and ends compared to the experience you and your child will gain.

Recognize and appreciate the kindergarten milestone. Kindergarten may symbolize the ending of your child’s complete dependence on you, but also marks an important beginning. It’s a very exciting time in your child’s life and also for you. After years of cutback you finally have time for yourself again.

See how BarterQuest can help you through this next stage of your life.

See what BarterQuest has to offer for this occasion:

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Part Two: Newborn and Toddlers

Your baby comes into the world; you’re happy yet insecure: am I doing everything right? Has my baby everything it needs? You need a few days to realize that there is a new family member living in your house now.

It takes time to get familiar with all the different needs of the baby, what it likes and dislikes or what it wants when it screams in a particular way. You don’t have to worry about doing something wrong. It’s in a mother’s nature to try and do everything for her baby.

“Making the decision to have a child is momentous – it is to decide forever to have your heart walking around outside your body.” (E. Stone)

So everything you do, you do not only for yourself but also for your child. You do it with love, passion and dedication, and the baby feels that. It will feel the comfort, the love and the attention. The newborn will receive only the best: the best products, the best food, and the best care, just because you want to make sure it’s fine. As far as child care is concerned, everything, starting from their health, hygiene and safety at home and outside the home needs to be considered.

Basically, if you fully dedicate yourself to the new challenge and trust your motherly instincts, you can’t do anything wrong. You will see your beautiful and healthy baby grow a little more each and every day.

You might like this offers on http://barterquest.com

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Part One Of Our New Daily Series About Mothers And The Challenge Of Raising a Child

Part One Of Our New Daily Series About Mothers And The Challenge Of Raising a Child

A new life’s challenge: having a baby! Within the next 9 months there are a lot of things to do and many things to consider, especially if it’s your first child. You have to get clothes, toys and furniture for your newborn. But it’s not necessary to spend all of your hard earned money on things that are brand new. The baby will grow so fast that you have to get new things almost every month.

To avoid stress, the soon-to-be mother should get all the important things for the baby step-by-step. A changing unit, the stroller and a car seat could be obtained during the pregnancy. Thereby, the mother should consider bartering as an option to save money, time and stay green.

But not only material things count to make a baby happy. Especially during the pregnancy, the mother should take care of herself. She should avoid everything which could harm the baby. Drinking a lot of water, vitamins and eating a balanced diet will help the baby to stay healthy.

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BarterQuest on FoxBusiness News.

No cash? No problem, if you barter

No cash? No problem, if you barter

originally posted by A. Kawlowski on http://www.cnn.com/2008/LIVING/wayoflife/09/02/bartering.rise/index.html

(CNN) — Miriam Brown has always wanted to visit Cape Cod, but when she recently began to plan a trip and found out she would have to pay $200 or more a night for lodging, her dream vacation seemed out of reach.
Miriam Brown and her husband bartered their services for room and board on Cape Cod.

Brown, who lives in New Orleans, Louisiana, is an accountant. Her husband is a home renovations contractor.

Like many people dealing with a soft real estate market and high food and gas prices, they just don’t have that kind of extra cash for a trip.

“I have traveled a lot in prior years, but after [Hurricane] Katrina, there’s just no money for traveling,” Brown said.

So she still plans to go, but she won’t spend any cash at all on lodging.

Brown has joined the growing ranks of Americans who are bartering — trading goods and services without exchanging money — as a way to cope with tough economic times.

Brown posted an ad in the barter community last month, offering to trade her accounting skills and her husband’s knack for home repairs in exchange for room and board on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

She has lots of company.

“When the economy turns unfriendly, users become far more creative to get their everyday tasks done,” Susan MacTavish Best said.

Swapping ‘to get by’

Other Web sites that put Americans in touch with like-minded people who are willing to trade everything under the sun have also seen a boost in traffic.

“I think a few years ago it was more for fun,” said Jessica Hardwick.

“But we’ve seen a real shift in the last year, and especially an increase in the last few months, where I think people are really doing it to get by.”

Some of the most popular items to trade for late this summer were school uniforms, which some parents found they could not afford to buy for their children, Hardwick said.

Experts aren’t surprised Americans are becoming more financially creative during an economic downturn.
Dealing with the economy

• 67 percent of consumers have haggled in recent months, compared with 33 percent in 2006

• 61 percent of consumers now regularly use a shopping list, compared with 35 percent last fall

• 70 percent of shoppers now look primarily for “the deal” in the Sunday inserts, compared with 51 percent last fall

“Historically, when times get tough, you see a 50 percent-plus increase in bartering as a way for people to be able to buy things or get things and do it economically,” said C. Britt Beemer, chairman of America’s Research Group.

The company talks with thousands of consumers every week to gauge their spending habits and attitudes.

A couple of years ago, many Americans had $500 to spend at the end of the month, but that money has evaporated because of rising prices, Beemer said.

“We’ve never had a time, at least in my lifetime, where you have food and fuel going up at the same time. So it isn’t a question of buying things, it’s a question of buying nothing,” Beemer said.

Breast implants and a horse

Businesses have long recognized the benefits of bartering, and there are hundreds of barter networks set up across the country to fill their needs.

They use barter credits as currency, so a plumber in need of a filling doesn’t need to search for a dentist’s office with plumbing problems to make a deal. He can fix a leaky pipe for one member of a network and use the credits he earned for that job at any other.

“Really, there are no limits to it. We trade for just about anything you can think of,” Michael Krane said.

Bartering on this scale is also robust in tough economic times. Krane said his exchange has seen a 20 percent rise in barter transaction volume in the first six months of this year.

A longtime client is Thomas Forrest, an orthodontist in suburban Pittsburgh who barters his services for everything from office improvements to stationery. His practice hasn’t been affected by the economic downturn, Forrest said, but some of his patients seem glad to be able to visit him under the barter arrangement.

“I think if you have a business owner who has children in need of braces, I sense a gratitude that that’s available,” Forrest said.

Barter exchanges must carefully document all trades, since the Internal Revenue Service considers income from bartering as taxable. However, a barter exchange “does not include arrangements that provide solely for the informal exchange of similar services on a noncommercial basis,” according to the IRS.

In New Orleans, Brown and her husband are getting ready to go to Cape Cod after finding a taker for her bartering offer. The couple will work five hours a day in exchange for staying in “a beautiful three-bedroom house right in the center of it all,” Brown said.

“We can do a lot more if we don’t have to pay for room and board,” she added.

Quote of the week

“He who wants to barter, usually knows what is best for him” – African Proverb

Ways to Save Money during Summer

originally posted by Farnoosh Torabi on http://tinyurl.com/2g2z3je

Summer’s well upon us, and after last year’s “staycation” trend there’s some pent-up demand to go out, get away and have fun. At the same time, we still want to save money. From dining out to buying airline and concert tickets, here are some great saving strategies, … and in some cases free deals!

Restaurants

Americans spent more than $200 billion eating out last summer, according to the U.S. Census.

Day Trips

• Look for Target free arts and culture events. The retailer offers free or discounted entry to museums, concerts and galleries across the country. This year there are more than 2,000 free events.

• Free summer movie days at Regal Theatres. The chain runs a “Free Family Film Festival,” with a nine-week schedule of free movies with select days and times.

• If you’re a member of a discount club you may get discounts when they buy movie tickets in bulk.

• The U.S. National Park Service is offering free admission on August 14-15 at more than 100 parks that normally charge a fee.

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Travel

The average family of four will spend $4,000 on a vacation this summer, according to American Express. Eighty percent of those surveyed said they plan to lower their travel costs. Here’s some help.

• Swap homes. Join a home exchange club like www.barterquest.com. There’s also a housing swap section.

• Book plane tickets on either Tuesday or Wednesday when prices are cheapest, according to travel experts.

• Reserve hotel rooms on Sundays, when the weekend rush is over and hotel managers have time to talk on the phone and discuss available discounts.

Beach

Stock up on food, drinks, beach towels and chairs before you get to the beach. Otherwise, you’re likely to pay a premium for things you can easily get for much, much less back home.

Bartering to save money — share your experiences

originally posted on http://littlehousesouthernprairie.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/bartering-to-save-money-share-your-experiences

Bartering to save money — share your experiences

I would love to live a life where, for reasons much more about Ain’t Got Extra Cash than fuzzy-wuzzy-community-building (though hell, why not), a nice chunk of what I need is exchanged through bartering.

So far my efforts have been not so hot. When I threw out my back and then lived in flabby-ass-confirming misery for two weeks, I posted a possible trade on Craigslist: Work in my garden, and in exchange, I’ll do some sort of writing/editing/tutoring work. I got two bites. One from a guy who wanted me to tutor his daughter, but when I emailed him back for specifics, he never responded; one woman said she didn’t do gardening work but if I needed my house cleaned and could pay her to do it, she was interested.

In the coming weeks, I’m doing to try some dog care swapping with another stay at home mom in my neighborhood. Basically, she’ll watch my pups when I go away for a few days and vice versa. I feel good about it, and if it works, this relationship could save us hundreds in kennel fees.

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But what keeps me from pursuing a full-on Life O’ Trading is …

1) For some of these jobs, like dog care or anything where I allow someone in my house, even when I’m there, I need to feel like I can really trust them. And to really trust them, I need to really know them. And if I really know them … I feel guilty about asking them to do any work, even if they’re getting work from me back, because everyone I know is already stressed out and busy enough, you know? In some ways it’s easier to hire a stranger who you can imagine has nothing to do all day except for help you. The unfortunate downside, of course, being hiring costs money. Is bartering best with some magical level of acquaintance?

2) Worries about inequity. I already suspect I’m going to be calling on my dog friend for help more than she will need to call on me. How do you keep things fair, and from one side from feeling overused?

3) That Person. The people who make you feel like you just should have done the project yourself or hired someone. You know, the usually-cool friend who sincerely volunteers to help, but doesn’t follow though because they’re “really busy right now,” and then you’re stuck with more work because you counted on them and shouldn’t have and need to figure out Plan B. We all know people like this, right? Let’s name names in the comments section! Just kidding.

I’d love to hear others’ experiences in bartering (or just, you know, a deal where you help out a friend and vice versa), and any tips you have to share!

Bartering is Back